Benera and Estefan
Conflict Lines, 2018                                                              
Installation (cut-out metal, prints on paper), variable dimensions

Google is forced to bow to legal pressure around the world and show international borders differently because of diplomatic disputes. Also, it changes the borders depending on the domain that the user has entered. In 2010, there was a case when wrong Google data briefly gave a piece of Costa Rica to neighboring Nicaragua, and troops were deployed because of that.

Although Google cartographic platforms Google Maps and Google Earth are the most frequently used Earth mapping services worldwide, it should be noted that their methodology for presenting borders is totally unregulated and that it differs from traditional cartography methods. More specifically, Google’s cartographic reproductions are neither developed on a scientific basis nor do they represent and hence reinforce borders as envisioned by a given country’s territorial interests and legislation. Not only that, Google will adapt borders depending on the user’s domain. So, if the user accesses the domain from country A, Google will draw borders differently than if the user were registered in country B. They represent and hence reinforce borders as envisioned by a given country’s territorial interests and legislation.) In the historical context, its role could be compared to that of the history-writing victors, which in most cases translates into the dominant position of power.

Conflict Lines represents an unmapped world-i.e. those areas on Earth that Google considers “mapless”- and thus points to conflict areas that the domain aims to cover. 



                 

             https://www.wired.com/2010/11/

                                                                                                                                       

                                                                                                                                        https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2010/nov/15